Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

recovering a chair

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • recovering a chair

    Oh dear, me again with another question.

    I'm trying to recover a 'tub' chair - now I've no true upholstery skills, but did do a loose cover on my soft furnishings course, and i'm using the skills I learnt there and trying to adapt them to a fixed cover.

    Now, I've got so far (inside back and side, curving round) and I now want to permanently attach this to the chair. I've not taken the existing top cover off, as I don't know what I'm going to find underneath, and as I say, I've no true upholstery skills.

    My problem is this (and I hope I can describe it accurately). I need to either staple or tack the bottom edges to the 'firm' seat (the bit under the loose box cushion), but tacks won't go into it, and i'm finding, even with an electric staple gun, the staples are not holding (i can pull them out by hand). now tapping the 'seat' sounds like it's hardboard, so I've no idea why staples aren't holding in it. Any ideas? Also, my staple gun won't let me get right into the 'crease' - where the back vertical meets the vertical seat - know where I mean? Again, is there another way perhaps I could deal with this?

    I've put so much into this already, I really don't want to give up but at the moment, I can't think of a solution.

    Any help available out there?? pretty please??
    Chris

  • #2
    Re: recovering a chair

    well, i've found out why the staples won't hold - i've removed part of the existing seat cover, and where my staples are going in is polystyrene! Well,it is a cheap chair, lol. At least it's got a wooden frame round it, so I just need to know what to use to get right into the crease, where the vertical back and sides meat the horizontal seat frame (got it? lol). I can't see any staple gun getting that close, so is there anything else I can use??

    Ta muchly.
    Chris

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: recovering a chair

      hi

      is the back of the chair off? and could you pull it between the arm/back part of the frame and the seat part of the frame and then secure it on the back of the frame? does that make sense? how is the previous cover attached? the only other way is to use tacks to secure, if the gap is to small for the staple gun.
      i am doing upholstrey at college but we have to strip everything back to the frame which sometimes is easier, but obviously takes much longer!!

      Mary

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: recovering a chair

        I have a small tack hammer that is magnetic. You can put the tack on the end and aim it at the back of the crease, it takes a little practice.

        Julie
        Julie

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: recovering a chair

          Hi there,
          Havent done any upholstery for several years, but we were only allowed to use tacks. If you pull it tight, and put the tacks half in, then you can remove to tighten or reposition. A magnetic hammer is a good investment and not too expensive.
          Good luck, I see you work through the night like me!!!!
          regards, Helen

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: recovering a chair

            Hia Flooz
            You are very, very brave attempting this tub chair.
            When I re-upholster a tub chair I make all the internal coverings in one section, using the old fabric as a template.
            It is far easier taking the whole fabric off, as then you get an idea of how it has been put on in the first place, and which rails the fabric has been attached to.
            I served my time as an upholsterer (5 years) and still learning - you are brave.

            Regards
            Julie
            Kind Regards
            Julie Monty

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: recovering a chair

              Thanks everyone. I haven't taken the existing cover off, mainly because if I totally fail, at least I've still got a chair to use, lol. It's not been upholstered in the traditional way either. I know you can pull the fabric through the frame to the back and fasten it that way, but from what I've seen, that's not possible on this one. I've got the inside pieces stitched together and just need to attach these before starting work on the outside pieces (which I know I'll have to sew by hand - if not all, most). I've got a tack hammer, but couldn't get close enough to the back to make sure the tacks are going into the frame, but i've just managed to get one in, albeit, it's gone in at an angle. But if that's what it takes, then sobeit. It'll be covered by the cushion anyway - and at least it's only for myself.

              I used this chair to make a loose cover for when I was at college, so at least I was already aware that tub chairs are difficult, because of the curve, but i'm not one to be put off by that, and i'll soldier on.

              Watch out for more frustrated questions, pmsl
              Chris

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: recovering a chair

                Hi Flooz,

                You are definately brave taking on a tub chair! Like Julie I have been upholstering for 5 years now and am still learning. Every chair is different, which is lovely in its own way.

                Its definately easier to remove all of the fabric. However if you really don't want to do this I would definately remove the fabric from the outer side of the chair. You can then usually see where the previous fabric has been attached to. I too make a template for the front of the chair.

                I did have one tub chair that was solid and the only place to attach the inner back was underneath the cushion. This meant I had to strip the chair right down though and then recover from there.

                Good luck, hope I can be of more help if you need it.
                Kindest Regards,
                Karen

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: recovering a chair

                  Urgh!!! This is such a cheap chair - I can't believe the bulk of it is polystyrene!!! which means I'm struggling to fasten the covering to anywhere!!

                  Still, i've got this far, how am I doing?? I've got a few 'creases' in the inside back that I just cannot get rid of, but I'm saying it give it a more 'lived in' look, pmsl. It's all the rage these days you know

                  Now I just need to see If I can attach a photo....
                  Chris

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: recovering a chair

                    Chris

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: recovering a chair

                      Hello Flooz,

                      Well done for having a go - looks like you're getting on really well too.

                      I think I would be tempted to take off the original cover. Upholstery is a bit like undressing and getting dressed again. What ever came off first, goes on again last and vice versa!

                      My upholsterers use a pneumatic staple gun. One of the attachments has a really long pointed nose for getting into deep, tight spaces. Maybe that's what was originally used to cover your tub chair.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: recovering a chair

                        I think so too Rosie. I sure can't get into those creases - and I'm reasonably sure that's why I can't get the fabric nice and taught (sp) over the inside back. Having found out how cheap the chair is, i'm loathe to take the cover off, as then i'd lose the chair completely if I failed.

                        Overall, i'm pleased with my effort. I'm nearing completion now, but shall post a pic of the final result, when it's done.
                        Chris

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: recovering a chair

                          Well, i got there in the end. Just finished (sore fingers now). There's a couple of things I think I could've done better, but overall, I think it's ok - ish, lol. (I'm very critical of myself). Having said that, given that i've not had any training in this area (although have done ONE loose cover, lol), I don't think it's too bad.

                          I've learnt a few things, like how difficult it is to use a curved needle (is there a knack to it?), but I haven't been put off trying it again when i'm bored with this fabric. I had to re-cut several pieces so although I started out with plenty of fabric, I ended up with just the right amount!! PMSL

                          Still, it's done ............. finally.

                          Chris

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: recovering a chair

                            Well Done Flooz
                            I think you have done a suberb job. I bet you got an enormous amount of satisfaction when it was finished.
                            What is your next project going to be?
                            Kindest Regards

                            Penny

                            Denton Drapes

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Curved needle - Arghhhhhh

                              Hello Flooz,

                              Well done with your chair. Big pat on the back! Will you ever let anyone sit in it?

                              Curved needles. They are tricky things aren't they? You're never quite sure where they're going to pop out next. There must be a knack.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X