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  • Hi

    Hi. My name is Chris. Having recently been given an astronomical quote for my conservatory cushion covers, I decided to try and teach myself. Alas my school needlework days are a far distant memory. However, I stumbled across the excellent Schuhby videos on youtube and in a very short time managed to produce 2 beautiful piped and zipped cushions which I'm very proud of - many thanks for your indirect help! Going to try a box cushion next! In the meantime, flushed with my initial success, I thought I'd make a roman blind, but here I've come a bit unstuck. The videos talk about stab stitching and I haven't a clue what that means and I've been unable to find anything to help me - can someone point me in the direction of an idiots guide or the like please?

    Many thanks

  • #2
    Re: Hi

    Hello Chris, glad you found us!

    It is lovely to hear that you have been successful in your cushion making and good luck with your box cushions. If you have a search here in the cushions section you may find some tips, if not, don't be afraid to ask!

    Stab stitch is when you pass the needle back and forth straight through the fabric layers several times to make just one stitch. It is commonly used to discretely hold several layers of fabric together like face fabric and lining on a blind, or layers of a quilt.
    Louise


    sigpic Simply Sewing

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    • #3
      Re: Hi

      Thank you Louise. That sounds straightforward to me. Guess I have no excuse not to start making the blind over the weekend!

      Chris

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      • #4
        Stab Stitch

        Hi Chris,

        As Louise says pass your threaded needle from the back of the blind through to the front, leaving a tail of about 4 inches. Pass the needle back having made a small, discreet stitch. You can now tie the two tails in a few secure knots BUT try not to pull the stab stitch itself too tie. You don't really want to see a 'dimple' on the front of the blind. You can now snip the tails off to about 1cm or, for an even more professional look, rethread the tails and stitch them back into the lining/interlining so nothing is visible from the back of the blind.

        I'd love to see a photo of your cushions and, of course, your blind when you've finished it this weekend.

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        • #5
          Re: Hi

          Hi there, welcome to the forum,
          When I first started stab stitching my blinds I had problems with the fabric pulling up slightly and leaving dimples in the fabric when the blind was down. You ned to make sure the face fabric is very flat and taut. I now often hang the blind up and stab stich whilst it is hanging to avoid this problem.

          Julie
          Julie

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          • #6
            Re: Hi

            Thank you Jules and Julie for your advice. Didn't get to start anything at the weekend as got sidetracked by a hunt for a puppy! Fabric suggests I should prewash it, so will try and do that today. Will keep you posted!

            Chris

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            • #7
              Re: Hi

              Hi Chris, welcome from me too. Good luck on your roman blind. Re. stab stitching- a tip I read on the forum is to place a pin under the face fabric thread loop before pulling 'thru. It helps to keep the stitch pulling from the front.
              Kind regards

              Cat

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