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  • Working with velvet

    Yes I know the dreaded velvet word

    Right I have quite a few questions:

    My next booking is a romo fabric , a ribbed velvet Lorenzo, the ribbed velvet pile goes up on one stripe down on another. My worries are that :

    1. joining the fabric at the seams , how do I prevent the fabric from being crushed when pressing? Is is best to herring bone the seams flat? ( seems like alot of hard work)
    2. I recall a velvet board ~ are these worth investing in?
    3. How do I insert the buckram ~they are double pleats on lath and fascia board so pleats in full view~ without damaging the face of the fabric.

    Oh,,, and they are heavily interlined and 9 widths in total! 3m in length

    I'm already stressing out over this one, and at £60.00+ per metre I cant afford to get this wrong. I'd appreciate some guidence.

  • #2
    Re: Working with velvet

    Hi Tam..

    I'd start by buying the velvet board I use mine all the time, both velet and chenille..

    Velvet Ironing Mat

    Allows you to iron velvet without flattening the pile. Consists of a sheet of fine, nylon needles with a tough cotton backing. Place the velvet face down onto the needles, and iron it on the back. For use with all ironing boards. Size 70 cm x 30 cm (27 1/2 in. x 12 in.).
    Velvet ironing mat link

    I'd use sew in buckram and do with all my hand..

    Philip
    Have you registered your business yet?

    http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


    A MyDecozo Directory

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Working with velvet

      Hi T
      I'm afraid I can't offer you any advise but I can sympathise with you. That job sounds like a nightmare.
      9 widths and 3mts long. i hope you have charged a good price. The only experiance I have with velvet is with my upholstery class. the last chair I did in a cotton velvet from Villa Nova. It wasn't nice as it marked so easily. Make sure to take off any rings with stones in as they will scratch the pile. Lets us know how it goes.
      Good Luck!
      Kindest Regards

      Penny

      Denton Drapes

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      • #4
        Re: Working with velvet

        Tam if your seams won't stay flat you can herringbone them down.. And you'll need a mitre for velvet also.
        Have you registered your business yet?

        http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


        A MyDecozo Directory

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Working with velvet

          What do you mean re a mitre for velvet I know what a velvet hem mitre is,

          also do I need to trim back the selvedges?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Working with velvet

            No, but if using a half width you need to overlock the raw edges, join this side and leave yourself with the selvedges on each outer edge.

            The mitred corners are done differently for velvet.
            Have you registered your business yet?

            http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


            A MyDecozo Directory

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Working with velvet

              Thank you Phillip,,,as always, a mind of very useful information.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Working with velvet

                I have been told that its to do with the collection of dust. If the pile runs upward, the dust catches and sits on the curtains. Not sure if thats why, but it was what I was told !!!! Seems to make sense to me. These curtains have a sort of stripe,one pile line upwards the next downward, so best I mark top and bottom before cutting

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                • #9
                  Re: Working with velvet

                  Actually Maureen Whitmore suggest the pile should face upwards so when you're running your hand bottom to top the pile feels smooth - Top to bottom it will feel rougher.. SHe states this makes the colour stand out more, but can be a problem on cheaper velvets.

                  We learn something everyday.. But is Maureen right?
                  Have you registered your business yet?

                  http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


                  A MyDecozo Directory

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Working with velvet

                    I have just bought the Maureen Whitemore book, out of interest, but have not reached that bit yet, so I wouldn't like to say, but I have always worked with the pile going down from top to bottom for the same reasons. Used to overlock the hems as well and do a single hem which make it sit nice and flat. Yes, the mitre corners are done differently to keep the bulk down and sometimes the selvedges need snipped and YES, I DON'T LIKE VELVETS EITHER.
                    ,

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                    • #11
                      Re: Working with velvet

                      I would always use velvet with the pile running up the curtain as the the colour is much deeper and richer. Velvet curtains with the pile facing down can look drab because of the velvet sheen which reflects the yellow colour of household tungsten light. When the pile faces upwards it tends to look richer because it doesn't reflect the yellow and the reflected light from other surfaces becomes lost in the pile. This was always more pronounced in Victorian times with both candles and oil lamps which, by virtue of the very low colour temperature of the light, carry a very yellow glow.

                      To clean the curtains you would simply brush the fabric ensuring that the final brush strokes are in an upward direction. Twice a year is normally adequate unless the house as a particularly dusty one..............................

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                      • #12
                        Re: Working with velvet

                        I'm so glad this topic came up.

                        Where I work I'm the odd one out, I say the pile should go up and for the same reason, a deeper richer colour. I've never heard of the velvet ironing mat before, I'll definately have a look. I usually just steam the leading edge and use a ruler to smooth it, often scalding my hand.

                        Velvet is one fabric I try to avoid.
                        Bev

                        The Window Dresser

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                        • #13
                          Re: Working with velvet

                          Maureen Whitmore says work with pile going upwards,and press with the ironing mat, the M & D book I have says just to make sure it all goes the same way, but does not say which way and the Jane Churchill book does not say anything about the pile. Take your pick.

                          Enid

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                          • #14
                            Re: Working with velvet

                            I am sure that Ironing mats are quite wonderful and I will endevour to find and purchase one on Philips recommendation. I just wonder how victorian curtain makers got on without them. I was taught by my mother to steam gently from the back on top of another piece of vevet, face sides together, with the pile running in the oposite direction to that of the face fabric and then quickly brush the pile of the hot fabric in the correct direction with a short haired stiff brush similar to those used in old fashioned snooker halls to brush the green baize of the tables.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Working with velvet

                              That's the problem I find, Enid, with books. Being self taught, they have been my only source of reference until the Forum. But now I have all of you to bounce things off.

                              Books seem to miss out the most basic and necessary bits of information, in my opinion. I always made clothes when I was younger, mainly ball dresses. I know there are different types of thread so sewing buttons on, for machine sewing, for sewing silk etc, but I never gave a thought about using anything other than machine thread for handsewing curtains. No where have I ever seen it written that you should use a stronger thread for interlining or sewing in linings.

                              I know I'm digressing from the topic 'working with velvet' but if the simplest things are left to chance, how do self taught people ever expect to make a quality item when basics are neglected?

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