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  • Finishing seams

    I am now nearing the end of our evening class project with the cushion and was surprised to find that we are not going to be neatening the seams in any way.

    When I did a little dressmaking many years ago, I used to spend many happy hours oversewing raw edges, French seaming and so forth (I was not good but I was thorough), and this does not seem quite right to me. Naturally, I have been in shops and seen how cushions sold commercially are neatened - and they are.

    What is the usual practice? The books do not go into it a great deal.

    Many thanks,




    Rachel

  • #2
    Re: Finishing seams

    Hello,

    I always finish my seams on my overlocker, this tidy's everything up and just stitches everything together. If you don't have one of these you could always do zig zag on the sewing machine. Not sure what others do.
    Kindest Regards,
    Karen

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    • #3
      Re: Finishing seams

      If the item is going to be laundered, then the seams should be finished to stop them fraying. I would do it anyway as a matter of course on cushions and loose covers.
      Kind regards
      Pen Harrison
      Colly Brook Fine Furnishings

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Finishing seams

        I always neaten mine by an overlock stitch to finish off. Makes it so much neater too

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        • #5
          Re: Finishing seams

          This sounds good to me. I don't have an overlocker but I can use the zig zag on my machine. I have used a roll and stitch method for clothing. I must confess that I could not understand why this step was missed out. Everything ends up in the washer in my house at some time or another - the six and a half cats see to that!



          Rachel

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          • #6
            Re: Finishing seams

            Rachel, you'll learn the basics on your course, and armed with the basics you will have to teach yourself the rest and learn as you go.. Tutor's often leave out areas which are very important and you will quite often find the student knows more than the Tutor. Take what you can from the course, read your books and fine tune at home. These courses are great confidence builders and you will complete the course satisfied that you know what you're doing, even if you've learn very little in class..

            You have the added benefit of the my.decozo members' knowledge and experience too!

            Philip
            Have you registered your business yet?

            http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


            A MyDecozo Directory

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            • #7
              Re: Finishing seams

              Hello

              Actually Philip the tutor should of told Rachel that she should either zig zag or overlock the raw edges on a cushion to prevent it fraying! Saying that I am doing a course at the mo for dress making - but someone is making a roman blind in the course (its a mixed course) the student said she would like the blind to be on the outside of the recess and the tutor said no thats not normal for a roman blind, I struggles to keep my mouth closed! no comments from you Pip!

              Kathy
              K W Designs
              Bournemouth

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              • #8
                Re: Finishing seams

                ...and I always thought that classes were supposed to teach to a "gold standard". I should have known better, of course - one does live in hope, however.

                I actually used to teach an evening course in anatomy and physiology and aromatherapy: I had no qualms about failing those who, at assessment, did not fulfil the assessment criteria. I wanted people to do things correctly. This course actually leads to a piece of paper and I suppose that I could achieve it by a minimum of effort - but what would be the pleasure in that? Thanks to those on the forum, I just might reach close to my personal "bar".



                Rachel

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                • #9
                  Re: Finishing seams

                  Tutor's often leave out areas which are very important and you will quite often find the student knows more than the Tutor
                  I agree Kathy, they should, and as I've already said.. They don't.. And something else that can't go unmentioned ...

                  What do you mean by?
                  I struggles to keep my mouth closed! no comments from you Pip!
                  Are you telling the users of this forum that you actually managed to keep your tongue still? I'm proud of you, that's a first and you did it while your Husbands away so he didn't get to witness it.. It's almost like Baby's first words.. I trust you've fully recovered now Kaf?
                  Have you registered your business yet?

                  http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


                  A MyDecozo Directory

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Finishing seams

                    Hi Rachel

                    I have done anatomy and physiology with swedish massage, we complained about first tutor - he normally taught sports massage and he was going very indept with everything and we felt it was very advanced, about ten of us left and were put into the following year free of charge!
                    Tutors miss things out maybe you should ask your tutor about fraying and see what her response is! she will probably think she needs to be on the ball more with you.

                    Kathy
                    K W Designs
                    Bournemouth

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Finishing seams

                      I think that I lost the odd one from the course that I taught. I was actually very fortunate in my students, although they were a very broad ability range indeed. They were also a lovely bunch of people and such fun.

                      I did ask for feedback and they said that I covered the anatomy and physiology a little too quickly - a point that I accepted. I was a little tough on one young lady: I had asked her to cut her long talons before massaging on numerous occasions and, when she did not, I failed her on her assessment on health and safety grounds. She cried! I was quite pleasant but stood firm.

                      Incidentally, I spent a little time making it clear that I did not believe in much of the hocus pocus behind holistic therapies and lecturing the class on the evils of smoking.




                      Rachel

                      P.S. If anyone wants some A & P handouts then I still have them on file.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Finishing seams

                        Six and a half cats????????

                        Ok, I'm fascinated - please explain that one to me!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Finishing seams

                          On one of the courses I did ie City and Guilds :

                          The other girl I went to college with had been taught to make roman blinds by putting a bit of velcro on the window frame and screwing vine eyes in all the way along. I tell you I taught that girl all she knows. I had no faith in any of the tutors - terrible standard.

                          Now at least with NDA you can be very self motivated and turn out work to the best standard you can do and not have to have inept tutors criticise you. I stumbled across a critical comment about some of of my work the other day which said it was very bad not to put buckram in goblet pleats and teacher was very concerned about this. If you take a look at my website you will see that the very goblet pleat as its scooped out. I had done it deliberately as I had been taught that on a Merrick and Day course previously and I got the effect I wanted - squishy goblets.

                          In the end the curtains were commended by the adjudicator marking the course and that information came through gritted teeth and in a whisper. A lot of college courses celebrate mediocrity in my opinion and no body should feel inadequate because they do not have a bit of paper. Do the course if you will learn something. I have done Merrick and Day courses, City and Guilds, a Higher in Design and now am nearly finished the NDA Inetrior Design course and loved it. I cannot see me doing any more courses unless it really will help me make more money.

                          Depending on your ability and obviously depends on the course (there are probably loads of great tutors out there). If you have a bit of experience you can do it at home, you will get out what you put in and experience, passion for the subject and ability counts for more than a bit of paper which can sometimes mean you simply completed the course at a poor standard.
                          Karen Rhodes
                          Karen Rhodes Design
                          Pole Design

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                          • #14
                            Re: Finishing seams

                            I used to teach City & Guilds soft furnishings to, I hope, a very high standard. It a student had a reason for making an item a particular way, e.g. they wanted to leave out the buckram because squashy goblets were required, that was fine. They had to produce a sample with buckram in, and a paragraph in their notes of the reasons why the item was done the way it was.
                            Kind regards
                            Pen Harrison
                            Colly Brook Fine Furnishings

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Finishing seams

                              There are good tutors and bad tutors. The lady who teaches us is very nice indeed: she teaches a class of primary school children during the day and is clearly good at sewing. Sadly, many courses do celebrate mediocrity - just as they do in many schools these days. Now, there is a can of worms for you.

                              Now, as for the six and a half cats. Well, it goes like this: I have six of my own - three Ragdolls and three Maine Coons. The neighbour's cat, Mr. Puss, considered that he was getting a raw deal in his home and, on observing my little family, decided to investigate their board and lodgings. He thus appeared at my door and gradually moved in. He now never goes back to his previous home and, having spoken to his former owners, it is clear that they are relatively unconcerned as to his fate. Occasionally, their children spot him - and he moves off quickly.

                              A month or so ago, another neighbour appeared on my doorstep ready to accuse my furry gang of decimating her garden. This is difficult as they only go out under supervision and I suggested that she turn her attentions to the owners of the other seven in the road! I thus decided that, if she cared to ask about Mr. Puss, I would announce that I only owned half of him, i.e. the front end. The rear is the property of No 15....



                              Rachel

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