Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Blackout roman blinds

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Louise
    replied
    Good point about pins pricks kls - when using blackout only on a blind I am very careful to use large paper clips to hold the sides and hems in place (not pins,) and try and pin at the stab stitch positions across the pockets when placing the lining before hand sewing to the back of the blind.

    Leave a comment:


  • kls
    replied
    I've made them using blackout for lining as Louise suggests. I've also used bonded blackout interlining. Have a good look at how blackout behaves with your face fabric re light through pin pricks. I have also used Black bolton twill inside but this adds to cost & weight.

    Leave a comment:


  • AFSSF
    replied
    Good to know. Thank you Louise

    Leave a comment:


  • Louise
    replied
    Not really, as the rod stitching lines are not tight up against the face fabric and do not pierce it either. Once the rod is in place there isn't really anywhere much for the light to penetrate. None of my customers have ever mentioned or queried that happening anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • AFSSF
    replied
    Thank you Louise for your reply.

    Yes I think this is coming down to cost with the client.

    This might sound daft but do you not see pinpricks of light where you have sewn the rod pockets in the blackout?

    I think I’m just not really a fan of lined blinds.

    Leave a comment:


  • Louise
    replied
    You can make lined roman blinds using blackout instead of cotton lining. I have done it for a few clients who are adamant they do not want (the cost of???) blackout interlined ones.

    I make up the blackout lining as I would if using cotton sateen - I sew the rod pockets in the lining, handstitch the lining to the back of the fabric then stab stitch across the rod pockets at intervals. Customers seem happy.
    You need to make sure your client understands that the stab stitches will let in pinpricks of light, especially in daylight. Also that the blackout will not go completely to the sides of the blind as it would with interlining.

    Leave a comment:


  • AFSSF
    started a topic Blackout roman blinds

    Blackout roman blinds

    Hi.

    I’d really appreciate your thoughts please.

    Whenever I make blackout blinds I’ve always used that bonded blackout and I find it gives a lovely finish to the blinds......gives that additional weight, reduces light bleed a lot etc.

    I have a client who is wanting some made but they want them blackout lined. I’ve never made these before and I’m not sure if they are something I’d actually like to make as I can’t imagine they are going to look that great ie: a bit limp. Am I correct in thinking that to make blackout lined ones, I would need to make rod pockets separately and stitch them on or do I just form the rod pockets from the blackout? There’s going to be loads of light bleed just from having them blackout lined no? Maybe I’m missing something because I don’t make these types of blinds.

    I have suggested to the client that they have them blackout interlined as it will give a much better look and reduce light bleed. I think someone else has quoted for them and has suggested that they’re just blackout lined. The client now wants to compare lined and interlined. Rather than making up a full quote as this just takes so much time, I think I will quote for just one of the bedrooms.

    Isn’t there an alternative to making blackout blinds?....wouldn’t you just sandwich some blackout lining in between face fabric and a lining. So you then would have three layers. What however would you charge for this though?....ie: would you treat it as an interlined quote or a lined quote please?

    Thank you
Working...
X