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  • Marking rod pockets

    I thought I'd take a few pictures showing how I mark my rod pockets when making romab blinds - Firstly I level off the bottom then using a set square I square the sides up and adjust the size. Once I have done this I use my grid board to measure up the lining and mark the rod pockets using a fine crochet hook to score the fabric - The scoring leaves a perfect fold line for sewing a 1cm allowance for the rods.
    [attachment=1:1i3ud6vm]lining1.jpg[/attachment:1i3ud6vm][attachment=0:1i3ud6vm]lining2.jpg[/attachment:1i3ud6vm]
    Have you registered your business yet?

    http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


    A MyDecozo Directory

  • #2
    Re: Marking rod pockets

    I also use rod pockets rather than tape - do you hand sew the rings to the stitching line or to the fold?
    Julie Evans
    Julie

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    • #3
      Rings

      Hello Julie

      Welcome to the forum - I have attached a picture showing how I sew rings onto the back of my blinds.

      [attachment=0:lbg8qu8c]Rod pocket rings.jpg[/attachment:lbg8qu8c]
      Have you registered your business yet?

      http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


      A MyDecozo Directory

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Marking rod pockets

        Hi Philip,
        Another great picture to show marking out Roman Bllind Pockets.'Tho I tried using the fine crochet hook for marking pockets ( obviously I've been using it the wrong way ) as by the time I went to mark the next pocket the last line had dissapeared!! However, I found using a dressmakers tracing wheel worked for me.

        The question I want to ask is - I get myself in a real pickle trying to get an accurate staight egde top and bottom for hems. I get there in the end but it's my New Years resolution to accurately mark out from the beginning as it's just so much work later having to unpick when I've got it wrong.!!

        I use a wooden floor to lay out fabric and measure from this, using the floor board edge as my guide. Not ideal I know ( you get sore knees for a start ) However, I do love it when I get an order for a small roman blind no bigger than 1 x 1.5mtrs. as it can be done on top of the dining room table!!

        But it occured to me that for all you lucky people who have workrooms and large tables will not be laying your clients fabric out on a workroom floor. So, how do you do it especially when you are working with two widths and above per. curtain. Is a set square essential? Do you work from the bottom edge first and move across the table

        I find myself trawling around this great forum looking for pics. or videos as I just find it so much easier to learn visually. I was on another post about how to apply fusible buckram for eyelets or triple pleats. I read and re-read it a dozen times until I was going cross eyed but still couldn't get it........until you posted very clear pics. a big thank you again.

        Cat C.
        Kind regards

        Cat

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        • #5
          Re: Marking rod pockets

          Like you, I also cut out on a wooden floor (am thinking of getting some skateboarding kneepads!) and to get a straight line I use a 150cm metal ruler across the width against an L shaped metal ruler (got them both from Merrick & Day) down the selvedge. I do now have a large worktable which will take a whole roll but I'll still probably cut on the slippery floor to avoid fabric "sticking" to the padded fabric covering of my worktable and pulling out of shape. In my dreams, I'd have 2 tables - one covered & padded and one not.
          Jane

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          • #6
            Marking rod pockets

            Have you considered buying a large piece of MDF, put a layer of padding on it and cover it with lining - You can then sit this on your dinning table to save you crawling around the floor. When not in use you can put it under your bed or lean it against a wall. If you add blocks to the underside covered with interlining you will be able to move the board around without causing damage to the table.

            Philip
            Have you registered your business yet?

            http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


            A MyDecozo Directory

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Marking rod pockets

              Thats how I started, just as Philip suggests. A piece of mdf covered with battons underneath to stop movement. Mine is still over my dining room table now but its got a table protector over the top and a cream table cloth. It sits 10 comfortable on curry /drinks/cards night and because its protected against stains I dont worry!

              My daughter is studying A level textiles so she just whips of the table cloth and protector and works off it! Its very handy

              The only down side is is very low to work off and kills my back.

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              • #8
                Re: Marking rod pockets

                Until I got my workroom, second son moved out and I moved in, I used to do what Phillip suggetsed. I had a 3ftx4ft MDF board, stored in the garage I must admit under a cloth, that I used on the dining room table. I am used to a bare board, but an old travelling rug and tablecloth ontop of the table, board ontop of that and no crawling around on the floor. It used to move a tad sometimes but was basically quite stable and, apart from being too low for me, worked well. Anuything is better than the floor. I know someone who puts her board ontop of a double bed....again not ideal but its not on the floor.

                Enid

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                • #9
                  Re: Marking rod pockets

                  Hi Jane,

                  Thank you for the reply. Good thinking, will fish out my daughter's old knee pads, somewhere in the depths of the attic ( you were probably joking, 'tho I'm not, my poor knees are killing me !!! ) I will also order a metal ruler and t square from Merrick and Day on Mon. that will give me more confidence that I'm getting things right from the start. Do you still manage fine on the floor even with two widths or more? I find that I just have just about enough space to lay out two widths.

                  Thank you Philip, Tam and Enid,

                  I guess I should really think seriously about getting myself better organised but the table is the only place I can put the sewing machine on at the moment. I did buy a heavy table protector and a thick pvc. cover which I find good for sewing as the fabric slides over well on this surface but would be no good for cutting etc. so I think it will be back to the drawing board....or sewing board in my case!!

                  Cat C.
                  Kind regards

                  Cat

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                  • #10
                    Re: Marking rod pockets

                    Hello Cat C.,

                    I am lucky enough to have a work room with a work table but I also drag my sewing machine onto it to sew sometimes. If I'm putting pleats in I find it easier to take the machine to the curtain than the curtain to the machine.

                    There's no reason you can't put your machine under your table, prep everything ready for sewing and then sew. It's amazing how much of my time is planning and cutting out, organising. The machining seems to be a small part when I think about it.

                    Good luck with a table top. You will save yourself so much back and knee and neck and shoulder pain! You could also perhaps raise your dining table to make it a better height with a few blocks of wood that the legs can sit into.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Marking rod pockets

                      I, too, work at the dining table, and I have an office chair on wheels to scoot down the length of the hems. An ordinary dining chair is too uncomfortable for long, and standing is deadly for the back.
                      I couldn't work on the floor, cat and teenager ensure it's never clean enough for long enough, apart from the fact that I've reached the age when getting up from the floor is quite hard work.Hence magnet-on-a stick for when I knock over the pintin. I know it's said to shorten the life of the pins, but I'd rather buy new pins than go back to back exercises.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Marking rod pockets

                        Rosie, thank you for the good advice. It does make sense to sort out the dining table with a worktop. It's not worth getting a sore back etc. We are going to work over the weekend making the dining room more flexible for me during weekdays.

                        Thanks again,

                        Cat C.
                        Kind regards

                        Cat

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Marking rod pockets

                          HI Nic,

                          Good idea using a chair with castors. My hubby is going to sort out the dining table for me so that I can use it more but I think I may be stretching his good nature a bit far by nicking his office chair from the study!!!

                          Sadly we no longer have our two cats, I smile when I think of the chaos that would cause if they were still around when I'm trying to cut out fabric on the floor!!

                          Cat C.
                          Kind regards

                          Cat

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                          • #14
                            Re: Marking rod pockets

                            I use 8 X 4 MDF over a pair of trestle legs. MDF is very heavy, which it needs to be, but don't assume it is an easy task to just take it off when you need the space! Mine has interlining, then several layers of lining over the top. It gets a new layer every year!

                            Most of my work is hand sewing, so my machine is lifted onto the table when needed, rather than taking the curtain to the machine.

                            Back to the original subject of marking rod pockets, I use pencil, but I have a simple method of calculating the lines.

                            I mark the fold line, not the stitching line, so for example if I have a blind with the pockets calculated to, 12cm bottom, 25cm, 25cm 25cm etc. Starting from the bottom edge of the lining, I add 2 cm to the first measurement, then mark the line squarely across the width, for the subsequent pockets I add 4cm. So the lines would be marked 14cm, 29cm 29cm etc. etc. This is the fold line, not the stitching line. I then simply sew 2cm from the fold. I find this method easier than trying to mark out parallel lines for each fold, and folding between them, and stitching on the lines.

                            Sue.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Marking rod pockets

                              Hello Sue,

                              I used to mark the parallel stitch lines but moved to marking the fold line, just like you do. Much simpler! I too use a pencil. Philip you must have very good eyes as I've tried with the crochet hook but can't see my line . Does anyone use those chalk pencils? I've also tried with an 'invisible' marker (purple line that's supposed to fade. The one fabric it doesn't fade from seems to be lining..... so not much use there.

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