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  • Adding an extra layer

    Hi.

    I’m quoting for some roman blinds at the moment. The client has chosen their own fabric. I’ve ordered myself a sample as it’s 100% linen and wanted to see how open the weave is etc. They are to be blackout and interlined. I normally use bonded blackout (BBO) with the fluffy side facing the lining. Placing the fabric on the blackout changes the colour a little. I’ve now tried it with white lining under the face fabric and then the BBO. I’d need to check with the client first as to which colour they’d prefer but I’ve not made a blind with four layers before. If they decide to have the four layers, would I just treat the white lining that’s under the face fabric as a whole piece ie:cut the same size as the face fabric? Are there likely to be any problems doing this?....don’t want to suggest it if it’s not going to look good etc. Thank you.

    Also, has anyone tried using BBO with it being cut to the same width as the face fabric and turning it in at the sides to give some more fullness to a linen fabric?

  • #2
    Personally I wouldn't try and fold in BBO.....

    The white lining sounds a better idea though.

    Louise


    sigpic Simply Sewing

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    • #3
      I've used black Bolton twill with a white fabric & had to put an extra layer in, I used white sheeting & it worked really well - sheeting was quite thin so didnt add too much bulk. I cut the sheeting to size of blackout. Hope that helps.
      KarenS

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Louise View Post
        Personally I wouldn't try and fold in BBO.....

        The white lining sounds a better idea though.
        Thanks Louise. Yes I didn’t think the BBO folded would work but it does give a nice feel. Maybe when I have a bit more time, I’ll trial it.

        With regards to the lining, would you treat it as though it is one piece with the face fabric? (thinking about how I do my heading and using the buckram and if that would work) .....or cut to the BBO size?

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        • #5
          Thanks KLS. I’ve not tried out the Black Bolton twill, although I do have a sample of it here so I may take a look at it. When you did that method, did you have face fabric, white sheeting, BB twill, interlining and lining?

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          • #6
            Another option for blackout could be to use Edmund Bell's Venus which cones in a range of neutral colours. They technically class it as dimout, but I've used it very successfully as blackout next to a layer of domette. It drapes really, really well.
            CatherineL
            Catherine Lepreux Interiors

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            • #7
              Thanks Catherine. I’ve not tried their Venus range. This client wants the room to be really, really dark. We’ve had the conversation that total blackout isn’t going to be possible. I will look into the Venus though and trial it. Presumably with this method you cut the dimout to finished size and catch the dimout and domette in your Velcro stitching? Thank you

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              • #8
                You could trial using double sided tape (DST) to secure the extra layer of lining/twill in place, as long as you positioned it away from any stitching areas
                Louise


                sigpic Simply Sewing

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                • #9
                  I think I used 4 layers (no interlining), be aware that BBT is quite heavy & if its a small blind it will seem quite bulky. I used it because the customer was anxious about pin pricks of light from stab stitches. The face fabric was cotton but open enough weave. Light will find a way through, above, under, around! especially at a sunny window.
                  KarenS

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                  • #10
                    I usually use bonded blackout with the fluffy side facing the lining, unless the face fabric is very pale then I just turn the bonded over. Takes a bit more time to sew that way but keep your needle as flat as possible so that it goes through the blackout at a shallow angle - this will help minimise the effect of the holes. If it's linen you may want to lock stitch every 10cm rather than stab to avoid sagging but again keep your needle flat to the fabric



                    Maz

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