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Roman Blinds - Help required

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  • Roman Blinds - Help required

    Here's one for you lot.

    When I make my roman blinds I stab stitch through all layers and I put my stitches through the blind on the stitch line underneath the rod pocket so no pin hole of light is visible when the sun shines against the blind.

    I sew my stitches in situ with the blind hanging from the shelf which runs around my workroom. That way I can see that all the layers of fabric are hanging cleanly prior to the stitching. The time taken to apply these stitches can be disproportionately long.

    I have been experimenting for a couple of years to try to come up with a method of attaching the layers of the blind together at the line of the rod pockets which does not involve stab stitching, a task which can be difficult on a wide blind when you are stitching in situ. My arms just aren't long enough sometimes and when this happens I pin in situ and sew on the bench.

    I have experimented with double sided fusible tape and a variety of other methods but I can not find a way of reproducing these few critical stitches in any other way.

    Does anyone have a better method Please ??????????

  • #2
    I do the same as you - hang the blind and stab sttch it. Like you say it can be very difficult at times.

    Some Forum users manage to stab stitch using the zip foot on their maching and I have not tried this as yet.

    I am sure someone will tell you about it - there are postings on the AW forum about it.
    K W Designs
    Bournemouth

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    • #3
      Philip knows how.

      Jules

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      • #4
        The problem is Kathy that the stitch needs to be loose because on a blind interlined with 280grm domett the stitch indents.

        stitching on a machine is out of the question as there can be no guarantee that the blind will hang out cleanly which is where most of the problems occur with blinds that look awful after a couple of years.

        I now only use one pass with size 36 thread and hand tie this at the back so that I can control the tension of each individual stitch.

        If only there was a little hand held machine that shoot the stitch through like one if those things that attaches labels to garments with little nylon strings but much more sophisticated and using thread and no plastic.

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        • #5
          Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

          This sounds like the tool that I wish had been invented to save interlocking. A friend of mine is convinced there is such a thing!!!!

          BEV
          Bev

          The Window Dresser

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          • #6
            Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

            Another way you could do this is to interlock the blind layers whilst on the worktable.

            Laying the fabric flat wrong side showing , smooth fabric and weight edges or clamp to table top, mark your pocket line either with pins or a removeable chalk/marker line, fold youre interlining along this line and interlock using floating stitches stopping short on the edges to allow the turn ins, add a small chain stitch from the interlining to the wrong side of the face fabric on the same line as the interlocking stiches fold up and move onto the next pocket mark. add your linings in the same way ontop of your interlining.

            Its a bit quicker, an alternative if you are stab stiching from hanging which can be awkward Not saying its the right way, its an alternative ( before someone shoots me down!)

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            • #7
              Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

              This is a very good method T and one which I have used myself. I find it quite time consuming when I am interlining the blind with 280grm Domett which I am invariably doing but I must agree that this is the only viable alternative to Stab stitching. The risk I believe you run with this method is not lining the fabric layers up correctly especially on a large or very long blind that has to be moved across the bench quite often to give you access to the stitch lines.

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              • #8
                Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                Yes I have done this recently on a small blind for wc room. It worked really well.

                because it was a plain velour fabirc and I was worried it would look un-sightly on the front.

                That just took me ages to remember the fabric - old age see

                Kathy
                K W Designs
                Bournemouth

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                • #9
                  Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                  When I do my stitches I place them 7" or 8" apart marked with a pencil, then I place a pin under it (so under the pocket) I do this as I pin the whole blind up pocket by pocket this is done face fabric down interlining then lining facing you, once the lot is done I turn it over to make sure the blind is flat, this is the point that if any pins need moving you do it then once everything is a ok I turn it back over and place one hand underneath and one hand stitching and keeping the tension and keep the blind flat. the idea is that placing the pins directly underneath your dot it stop everything moving and you can get it done a whole lot quicker.
                  TIA
                  Gerry

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                  • #10
                    Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                    I have just returned from a patchwork week-end and used a neat little gadget just as you described to anchor the three layers of my quilt together. It took all of 30 minutes, I couldn't believe it. It was called a microstitcher will see if I can track it down on the web. I did wonder if it could be used for blinds!!
                    Jane

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                    • #11
                      Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                      Here is the tool, but have just misread your post. Never mind it may be useful!!! http://www.ladysewandsew.com/micro_stitch.htm
                      jane

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                      • #12
                        Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                        Hello...

                        Do you speak of ths little gadget? The faithful tagging gun... Great for many things - Use 4.4mm, 5mm, or 7mm tags only, otherwise they are too large.

                        [attachment=0:2l3szyxg]s70932co.jpg[/attachment:2l3szyxg]
                        Have you registered your business yet?

                        http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


                        A MyDecozo Directory

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                        • #13
                          Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                          I've found eyelet pliers on the draper website - it's £9.52 (part no 31096) and a bag of 500 x 4mm eyelets (part no 3110 is £2.68. Not too expensive Think I might get one - hate sewing on all those little rings and I think this would look neater. Is this the one you use Philip?
                          Jane

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                          • #14
                            Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                            I am going to have a better look at the microstitcher that shelly recommended. I know that the stitch it places in the fabric will not be a permenant one and that it will need to be removed after final stitching. It does, however, appear to provide more stability than the tagging gun. The ultimate tool for me would be something similar to both but actually uses 36s thread to put one stitch in place from the back of the blind beneath the rod pocket.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Roman Blinds - Help required

                              the Microstitch is the same as the tagging gun, in actual fact it's a cheaper version using 4.4mm tags. It's the size of the tag thats important - You can use the 4.4mm in the microfine tagging gun and save yourself a tenner in the process..As with most things, the microstitch is being sold as a purpose made machine, when it isn't and this is why they are sold at anything up to £48 each.

                              You can buy the Quicktag from Moplan, and the buy the 4.4mm tags from other outlets. The picture below is the Microstitch, as you can see the Microstitch and the Quicktag are exactly the same.. Only difference being the price. Both guns take the 4.4mm tag. I've been using these for years and they do have many uses, but they will not replace stabstitching..

                              I have purchased some of these tags to put in my gun and I will report back when they arrive.
                              Philip

                              [attachment=0:22vr30lo]AD11187.jpg[/attachment:22vr30lo]
                              Have you registered your business yet?

                              http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


                              A MyDecozo Directory

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