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  • Blackout hemming

    I have just spent an hilarious half hour trawling through all the discussions (and arguments) over blackout handling, Although I now know how to handle this beast in the general making up, how on earth should I handle the hemming? I don't want to go down the 'bagging' route ( terrified of twisting) The curtains will be interlined, so how do I hem the lining without light bleed? Or is there anything other than 3 pass in a light colour that I can use instead?

  • #2
    I would simply machine a single hem on the blackout, then make up as I would an interlined curtain. Once the blackout hem is behind the interlined hem of the fabric I have never noticed any light coming through the hem stitching.
    Louise


    sigpic Simply Sewing

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    • #3
      Yes, I now only do a single hem, it does not fray, and avoids bulk. I would not worry about light bleed behind interlined curtains.
      Sue

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      • #4
        Thank you both, a great weight off my mind, Now can anybody recommend another type of light colour blackout fabric which isn't a 3 pass?

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        • #5
          Have you ever come across black bolton twill Cathie. You can get it from M&D. It is an alternative to using blackout lining although it is black in colour. They will send you a sample.
          You would interline your curtain as normal then add a layer of black bolton twill as another interlining then add lining as normal. Making 4 layers in total.
          It can make the curtains quite heavy but does work a treat although make sure you use a cream or ecru coloured lining as it can show thru on the back of the curtain.
          Alternatively you could also use Dimout avaliable from Edmund Bell. It is a very fluid fabric and it does not hold a crease which makes pressing in hems a challenge.
          Personally I do not like dimout as I find it tricky to handle, however I know Tam is very experienced at using it so could probably give you some pointers.
          Kindest Regards

          Penny

          Denton Drapes

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          • #6
            Thank you Penny. I have used the bolton twill before from M&D, and it was brilliant. I used it on Dark coloured curtains, so it wasn't a problem. I am reluctant to use dimout, after reading all the posts relating to it, I think I would prefer to avoid that. These will be pretty heavy curtains in the first place, also pale in colour as they are going to be for a childs bedroom, huge regency windows with 480g bump, so I don't think I had better use yet another layer. I think Sue comforted me by saying that the hem stitch wouldn't bleed with the interlining.
            I was just wondering, with all the posts about using 3 pass on romans and the problem of stab stitch light bleed, has anybody used the bonded interlining method together with 3 pass? does the bonded interlining help prevent bleed sufficiently?

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            • #7
              Hello Cathie
              There have been lots of posts on the subject of bonded and bonded blackout interlining. If you use the saerch facility I am sure you will find what you are looking for.
              But just an add to this I would not use bonded interlining with blackout lining. Personally I use bonded blackout interlining with a lining. You should not have too many problems with light bleed thru stab stitches unless the fabric is very light in colour. I then use tiny discs of blackout over the top of the stab stitches on the wrong side to stop the problem.
              Kindest Regards

              Penny

              Denton Drapes

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              • #8
                I don't understand how you stick the discs on if the blackout is an interlining. Don't you stab through all 3 layers (face, interlining and lining)? Or is that just for roman blinds...? Sorry, I just can't picture what you are doing here
                Thanks,
                Amanda
                ​Amanda

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                • #9
                  I am sorry I did not explain very well Amanada
                  I use blackout bonded interlining to interline the blind then add the lining on the back in the normal way. If I know I am going to have a problem with light showing thru the stab stitches holding all the layers together then I add small discs of blackout over the top of the stab stitches on the back of the blind to cover up the hole that the needle has made making the stab stitch.

                  I hope that makes sense now.
                  Last edited by Louise; 7th June 2011, 09:00. Reason: typo
                  Kindest Regards

                  Penny

                  Denton Drapes

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                  • #10
                    It does, thanks! So the discs of blackout are stuck to the lining fabric. Thanks again.
                    ​Amanda

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                    • #11
                      The problem of light bleed is really only relevant if the curtains/blind are closed/down during daylight hours. I think we do sometimes get hung up on it ... it does not cause a problem in most circumstances. I noticed it this weekend when it was very hot and I closed my kids blinds (black-out/interlined) during the day. Otherwise, it is not a problem.

                      Sue.

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                      • #12
                        I do agree Sue, also I am sure romans cause the biggest headache over curtains, still it only needs the one unhappy customer to criticise................

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                        • #13
                          I think you just have to say that there may be a small problem with light bleed and if they are happy with that, go ahead. Once you have informed them, don't agonise over it!!
                          Kind regards
                          Pen Harrison
                          Colly Brook Fine Furnishings

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                          • #14
                            Re: Blackout hemming

                            What is the general consensus on the making of side hems for black-out curtains. They are lined only. Should I take the lining into the side hem and then turn over a double side hem on the fabric?

                            Can't remember the last time I made black-out curtains, I do know that I do not like the empty side hems that let in the light.

                            Thanks.
                            Sue.

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