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Advantage/Disadvantage over curtain making up method

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  • Advantage/Disadvantage over curtain making up method

    Hi,

    I've finally got round to cutting up the fabrics and have made the unlined curtains. Didn't realise what a struggle it was going to be without a long enough table and not helped by carpeted floors. For those who works/makes a living sewing curtains, I salute you. Going to start work on pencil pleat lined curtains using wide width sheeting fabrics for the bay windows.

    I've seen different methods of lined curtains being made and wonder if there are any difference or preference one over the other? Or if right or wrong?

    The few that I've come across unless there's more are:
    1) Single hem on both main and lining fabrics overlocked or sewn together with right side of fabrics facing. No machine stitches seen at main fabric.
    2) Single hem on both main and lining fabrics. Wrong side of lining fabric placed on top of wrong side of main fabric and sewn together. Machine stitches seen at main fabric.
    3) Double hem on both main and lining fabrics each sewn separately. Lining fabric is hand sewn to main fabric. Machine stitches seen on main fabric.

    Hopefully my explanation can be understood.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: Advantage/Disadvantage over curtain making up method

    Most curtain makers would proceed as follows:-

    1. Hem fabric with a deep double hem, suggest 2 x 10cm, using a hand or machine blind hem stitch. Stitches virtually invisible from right side.
    2. Hem lining with narrower double hem, suggest 2 x 5cm, machined.

    then either

    - trim the lining so that it is 15cm narrower than the fabric, lay panels right sides together with the lining hem a few cm above the hem edge of the fabric and machine the side seams bottom to top. Create a mock mitre at the hem side edges.

    or
    - turn the side edges of the fabric in about 6-7cm and create a mitre with the bottom hem at the corners. Then lay the lining flat over the fabric, wrong sides together, with the hem edges aligned as before. Turn the lining under itself until about 3cm of the side turning is visible and pin. Repeat on the other side, trimming excess lining if necessary. Then hand stitch the lining in place.

    You can find further info here lined curtains or if you have time to go to the library I can recommend The Encyclopaedia of Curtains by M&D.
    Louise


    sigpic Simply Sewing

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    • #3
      Re: Advantage/Disadvantage over curtain making up method

      Hi Homesweethome,

      I think most of us would do a double hem on both face fabric and lining fabric (unless lining is blackout when one turn seems sufficient) BUT hand hem or use a blind hemming machine. This way NO stitches are seem on face fabric hem.

      I don't have the hang of the QUOTE thing but

      2) Single hem on both main and lining fabrics. Wrong side of lining fabric placed on top of wrong side of main fabric and sewn together. Machine stitches seen at main fabric.
      but I haven't seen this way discussed here or anywhere else I don't think for machine stitched in linings - often called bagged out but the fabrics have to be face or right sides together to achieve this.... the only time it's wrong sides together is where lining are hand stitched in and the small, neat side seam stitches are not seen from the back or the front.

      This way, the already hemmed face fabric is laid on the table or floor with the face side to the floor and the back of the fabric upermost. The sides of the fabric are turned up and over, perhaps about 7cm. Then the hemmed lining is placed on the top of this. I set the bottoms/hem levels so that I can see an inch of the hem of the face fabric below the hem of the lining. The sides of the lining are turned under so I see an inch of the side of the curtain fabric all the way from top to the hem. The lining is then 'slipped' (see slip stitch in the glossary) into place. The tops are turned to the back (lining side) of the curtain to create the desired length and the heading tape is pinned and them machined in place.

      Do you have any curtain making books with pictures explaining step by step? How did you do the first pair you've just finished?

      Do let us know and perhaps we can help with this second pair.

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      • #4
        Re: Advantage/Disadvantage over curtain making up method

        Hi

        When I make curtains I use a 8cm x 8cm hem on both the lining and the main fabric. The depth is really a cosmetic thing and some curtain makers use 10 x 10, but always use a double hem it looks better). The main fabric is always hand stitched but I machine sew the lining hem.

        The lining is hand sewn to the returns of the main fabric (that's the fold back of the main fabric to the wrong side), after the return itself has been sewn down. This prevents the edge from flailing open and keeps a lovely crisp closing edge to your curtains. (And also to the other vertical edge).

        Then if you lay the fabrics flat on to a large surface or the floor and smooth the lining over the main fabric (with wrong side to wrong side) you then do a loose and long 'blanket stitch' the full drop of the lining so that you are loosely catching the two layers together. This helps the curtains flow together and they will hang better too. Repeat this at each join in the fabric . At the other side catch stitch the lining to the main fabric.

        I hope this makes sense please contact me if you have any other questions and Good Luck!

        Ann

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