Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

bonded lining

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • bonded lining

    Hi,

    I have just finished a pair of curtains with triple pleat heading. The customer wanted bonded lining. I have hung the curtains up on a pole in my sewing room and have wrapped scraps of lining around them to settle the pleats. They look fabulous but as soon as I take the scraps of lining off they spring out all over the place. I know the lining is thicker and is probably the cause of this. The customer will not be collecting them until Saturday. My question is will they settle after a week or will they always be untidy looking? Probably a stupid question for all you professionals but I'd appreciate any help. I haven't made tie backs as I think corded luxury ones will look nice as the material is silky.

    This is the first time I've used bonded lining.

    Cracker

  • #2
    Re: bonded lining

    The theory behind bonded interlining is great, but the reality is a different thing - Personally I wouldn't take it as a gift, and I have and will always refuse to use it. If you're having problems at the hem you can open it up and peel back the interlining off the lining removing the bulk, cut off and re-hem with a single turn. You can do the same at the side turns if bulk is a problem there too.

    It won't settle down, it'll still be the same in the morning, and the morning after and forever after.. Sorry but it has the draping ability of a brick wall.

    Philip
    Have you registered your business yet?

    http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


    A MyDecozo Directory

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: bonded lining

      And I think it will be the last.....at least for curtains.
      If you search ' bonded lining' on the forum you will find lots of questions, answers and comments on it. Useful for roman blinds but not popular for curtains for exactly the reasons you describe. Keep your curtains bound till you deliver and if that was what your customer wanted, its her choice, but I would not use it unless for romans.

      Sorry, Enid

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: bonded lining

        Thanks Philip and Enid,

        I did mention to the customer that it was very thick and would probably be chunky looking, but she said a friend suggested getting bonded lining to make them rich looking. I know don't ask - lol - as you say my last pair.

        Thanks again for all the advice on the forum. I hemmed a pair of my own curtains (hanging up at least 6 months - typical your own house never gets finished)) and used the slip stitch as shown on your video - your a master craftsman Philip as we would say in Ireland. I used to hem from left to right and the finished hem had a cross over stitch, I have no idea what it's called but I learned it some years ago. I think from now I'll use the slip stich as the hem is just perfect. Thanks again.

        Cracker

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: bonded lining

          As your client wants tieback, I think they and the fact you've hand made a triple pleat heading will be your salvation this time. At least the curtains can be kept under control with the tiebacks and they will settle to a degree with a hand pleated heading - can you imagine putting tape on the stuff? I shudder to think of the effect .

          There are many grades of Bonded Lining. LA no longer interline in the traditional fashion but use Bonded Lining as standard. However, the one they use is super drapey, though expensive.

          Like others here I will not use Bonded Lining for curtains but do use it for Roman blinds.

          Lessons are tough to learn but at least it was at the customer's request and not because you thought it to be a wonder product.

          Very best of luck with your fitting.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: bonded lining

            I use bonded lining for flat valances where a softer effect than buckram is required......but then I am working with it's 'stiffness' rather than against it ,and you are certain the interlining layer will not move.
            Louise


            sigpic Simply Sewing

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: bonded lining

              Now that's an interesting use. Do you cut it to the size of the buckram and simply use it instead, Louise?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: bonded lining

                Yes, use it instead of buckram for a quick result. Cut to the exact size of the valance and make the fabric hems wrap around it. The fabric almost clings to the interlining side, and the lining is then already there on the back. You can machine the bottom edge (but allow enough fabric for a hem to turn to the back) then hand stitch the side hems. Make the top hem and velcro as you would a roman.
                Louise


                sigpic Simply Sewing

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: bonded lining

                  Just a thought! have you locked the lining to the face fabric in any way because if you havent it will spring apart.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: bonded lining

                    When you say a flat valance (I know stupid me ) what exactly do you mean? Do you mean like a pelmet? I'm really eager to learn as I'm self taught - I started making curtains and roman blinds and have lots of people asking me to make them but other than that I'm in the dark. I will organise to take some snaps of my curains and ye can have a look.

                    Cracker

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: bonded lining

                      Yes, like a pelmet but with no hard structure - interlined fabric held on to pelmet board with velcro. Can be seen in various high street stores and on their web sites......I find customers with more contemporary style rooms like them.....

                      You can see a photo in the current L Ashley catalogue, p252 (although I don't machine my velcro on with 2 rows of stitches showing on the fabric)
                      Louise


                      sigpic Simply Sewing

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: bonded lining

                        Thank you for explaining Louise. So, instead of canvas?

                        As to sewing on your velcro with two lines of machine stitching, I don't suppose Philip would have you as an administrator if you did! Maybe we just leave those methods to the 'professionals' like LA?

                        Though, I have to add I used some of their machine embroidered silk last week and it made up beautifully.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: bonded lining

                          Thanks all,

                          I have now had a look at p.252 LA Catalogue and understand. Thanks for all the info.
                          Cracker

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: bonded lining

                            Well my customer collected her bonded lined curtains today and was very happy when she saw them hanging up. I wrote some instructions for her as she has to have the pole put up on Monday, so hopefully she will be as fussy as myself when she hangs them. I tried to post a photo on the site but the size was too big and haven't a clue if I can resize it. Again thanks to you all for advice.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X