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  • Lock stitching

    If we are to try interlining using the large grid method, why can't each stitch be an individual one, locked off at about an inch long, so they still float? Then a new stitch can be made, locked off, cut, restart and so on? As each stitch is independant, once locked off, can't they be treated as such? Do we need to join these few stitches together with long strands of thread that serve no purpose? It would be different if each stitch wasn't locked off.

    Views?

    Jules

  • #2
    Re: Lock stitching

    I take your point Jules but if you look a little more closely at what you are suggesting compared to what is required I think you may be creating a problem for yourself in that if you make an independant stitch which is in effect a 1 inch loop of thread with both ends sewn in at the base there are quite a lot of passes through the fabric made to achieve this.

    The way I am approaching this to consider how much drag would be placed on each stitch if you were to get hold of the face fabric in the centre of the curtain and give it a good yank. In my curtains this would have the effect of dragging the threads through the stitches and tightening them across the grid like throwing a pebble in a pool. The stitches closest to where you were were yanking the face fabric being tightened into small knots. This could have a disastrous effect on the whole curtain albeit that it would rarely occur in the way I have described it. I will work on this more before comming back and answering more fully but for now my opinion is that there are only two passes through the fabric and one pass behind the thread in the stitches I make. I suspect and will endevour to prove to myself first that one further pass through the interling with the correct stitch will be sufficient to lock off the loop before moving on to the next stitch leaving enough slack in the line of thread between stitches so that it does not interfere in any way with the natural movement of any of the layers of fabric.

    Watch this space

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    • #3
      Re: Lock stitching

      Oh

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      • #4
        Re: Lock stitching

        And what is "oh" suposed to mean ??? Dissapointment, Confusion,

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Lock stitching

          Just 'Oh'.

          Can't get my head round this. IF I lock each stitch and then carry my thread all the way up to the next stitch, what's the difference between that and cutting my thread and starting again? I'm only going through face fabric with one stitch, just as I normally would. OK, if I didn't lock off each stitch, this would support the 'running through' principle, but, if I am locking each stitch, what's the difference cause they can't run anywhere anyway?

          Jules

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          • #6
            Re: Lock stitching

            Yep i'm with u there Jules
            Regards
            Mairi

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            • #7
              Re: Lock stitching

              Jules - You are clearly correct in your last post and I respect what you are trying to achieve. When I interlock a three metre length between interlining and face it is a fluid fast action that takes me about 2 mins max. It takes me longer to move the fabric across the bench than it does to put in a line of stitching. Even if I were making say 6 or so stitches up the line it would take me a lot longer to lock each stitch, cut the thread and move on to the next stitch only to have to secure my thread again, make the loop and lock the thread and cut it. The other point is that some of the curtains I produce may hang at their windows for 50 even a hundred years as some of the curtains I have replaced have, I have been informed, so done. When you use continuous thread from top to bottom of the line there is little possibility of any individual stitch working loose or being broken by rough treatment. It is one of the reasons that one uses continuous thread in the interlocking process.

              Jules you have my word that I will look at this stitch again and post a rational explanation of mu thoughts on the matter --- when I have finished these Blasted Box Cushions.

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              • #8
                Re: Lock stitching

                Sorry,

                Was making a sandwich. The only benefit to me of trying with individual stitches, is less thread to get tangled up in. Otherwise, it seems just the same.

                I feel for you and Philip. He's still wrestling with nasty fabric and you're still on your cushions. Will you please post a pic when they're done, if you're not sick of seeing them.

                Jules

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                • #9
                  Re: Lock stitching

                  Jules the cost of thread is nothing in comparison to the job falling apart within my lifetime. Your sandwich will cost you more than the cost of my 36s hand stitching thread for a month. That is unless there is just Marmite in it.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Lock stitching

                    I know I added a reply to you, but it's gone. Is said something like 'it's not the cost of the thread, but the length that annoys me'

                    Jx.

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