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goblet pleats or triple pleats to attach on a track

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  • goblet pleats or triple pleats to attach on a track

    please help.

    My Mum wants me to make her some curtains with either a goblet or french pleat heading(using buckram not tape) (no problem so far), but they are to be attached to a track in a bay window. Now whenever i've done these types of heading before, they've always been on a pole, so the curtain pin hooks simply hook onto the ring. I've been looking on the net to see how you would attach any hand made heading to a track, but only found that the curtain pin hook should be used in place of the plastic hooks that come with the track.

    Can anyone tell me - is this right? Do the pin hooks really glide across the track as necessary? or am I missing something?

    Many thanks for your help.

    Chris

  • #2
    Re: goblet pleats or triple pleats to attach on a track

    Hi Flooz

    You'd make the curtains as normal but place the stab hook lower down in the pleat and hook this into the hooks on the track - Level the top of the curtain with the track - You could consider a facia for the track, read this post lath/facia originally started by Tamatha.. You could then look at this post which makes it all a tad clearer.

    Philip
    Have you registered your business yet?

    http://www.ukcurtainmakers.co.uk


    A MyDecozo Directory

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    • #3
      Re: goblet pleats or triple pleats to attach on a track

      Hello Flooz,

      When you hang pencil pleat taped headed curtains from a track or pole, you put plastic or metal hooks onto the curtain tape and then hang from the carriers on the track.

      When you make hand headed curtains (triple/double/cartridge/goblet pleat headings) you need to put something into the back of the pleat that will do the same job as the plastic/metal curtain hooks. You use 'pin hooks'. They are metal pins that push into the buckram and then slip into the cup hooks at the bottom of the rings on poles or go through the circles at the bottom of the plastic carriers that glide along curtain tracks.

      One thing you have to remember is the 'spaces' (the curtain that falls between the pleats, whatever type they are) will have to push forwards of the pleats. If the hand pleated headings were hung from poles, the 'spaces' would then push back behind the pleats.

      Goblet headings take up more space when the curtains are 'open' so create more 'stack back'. If the spaces are dressed to the front (as will happen on a track) the stack back will be increased further.

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      • #4
        Re: goblet pleats or triple pleats to attach on a track

        Don't know the lay out of the bay , but I always try to take the curtains round to the front of the wall if space allows. Stops the gap showing , draughts if there are any, allows for more stack back and light in the bay and just looks better....well I think so., but as has been said in previous posts, see Phillip, hand headings don't look so good on a track.

        Enid

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        • #5
          Re: goblet pleats or triple pleats to attach on a track

          Thanks everyone - I guess I need to look at the track (it's not fitted yet) and see if the gliders have rings on the bottom. I'm thinking that this would perhaps stop the heading of the curtain sitting flat against the track.

          My Mum's a very simple woman, and won't worry that the track is showing or anything, so that's not a problem (although I would personally hate it), but did want something a little different to the normal pinch pleat heading. In light of your comments, are there any suggestions?

          I'd thought about making normal curtains with a faux valance at the top with a pretty trimming, then wondered what it would look like if the valance wasn't included in the heading pleats - instead sort of billowing freely from the top, but couldn't imagine what it would look like (I know what I mean, not sure if i've explained it well).

          I just like to do something different, although have to remember my own limits skill wise.
          Chris

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