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Re-inventing the wheel

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  • Re-inventing the wheel

    Why is it, that every job I've done recently seems to involve me having to go back to scratch and work out from the beginning how to make a curtain !!

    The latest is to do with the width of the fabric. This customer keeps angora goats, and has had the wool woven into a bolt of fabric. 58m of fairly loosely woven stuff, and it is 150cm wide. She wants as many pairs of (mostly sill length) curtains as possible out of it.

    I've come to start the first pair and have already got a problem. It needs one and a half widths in each curtain. The interlining obviously needs to be joined as well. Normally I would match the interlining and fabric seams and trim off the excess fabric. But in this case (trying to get as many pairs out as possible), I need the full one and a half widths and I'm using two widths of interlining. So the interlining seam does not lay on the fabric seam and because of the loose weave of the fabric the seam shows through as a dark line, which I dont like.

    So I've come to a halt.

    Am I obsessing about this? Does it matter that the interlining seam shows? It has to in this case to maximise the width of the fabric, so I cant do anything about it, can I?
    Kind regards
    Pen Harrison
    Colly Brook Fine Furnishings

  • #2
    Re: Re-inventing the wheel

    Can you railroad it? How long is sill length in this case?

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    • #3
      Re: Re-inventing the wheel

      No, I can't railroad it - I thought of that but the lengths are too long.
      Kind regards
      Pen Harrison
      Colly Brook Fine Furnishings

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Re-inventing the wheel

        I think i would discuss the problem with the client and let her decide. Either as many pairs as poss with the line of interlining visable or not so many pairs with seams matched.
        I tend not to worry about lining seams up unless it is a light weight fabric and you are going to see it.
        Kindest Regards

        Penny

        Denton Drapes

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        • #5
          Re: Re-inventing the wheel

          I agree with Penny - I'd speak to the client & let her make the decision.

          I also don't worry too much about matching joins unless the fabric's light & the seams will show - in fact on bulky fabrics & especially with pencil pleat tape,
          I often purposely place the seams slightly apart from each other otherwise the tape doesn't always pull up properly.
          Jane

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          • #6
            Re: Re-inventing the wheel

            Sorry, yes of course you'd though of that. What I think I meant is can you railroad interlining? Will it hang properly? I suppose it depends what one you use, but I mostly use bump (Northeast Scotland, draughty Victorian houses) and I can't see it hanging properly.

            I doubt the lines will be visible to anyone but you once the curtains are pleated and hung, but discuss it with your customer, or you'll worry yourself to death, and it ain't worth it.

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            • #7
              Re: Re-inventing the wheel

              Hi Nic,
              I can't railroad the interlining because the lengths are too long. But yes, generally you can. Often works well on roman blinds.

              I have gone ahead and made this one pair with the seams not matched. The fabric width on all of the others can be cut down so that the seams do match.

              If the weavers had used a 137cm wide loom, they could have got another few metres in length with the wool available, meaning another pair of curtains!!
              Kind regards
              Pen Harrison
              Colly Brook Fine Furnishings

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              • #8
                Re: Re-inventing the wheel

                Hi Pen,

                I would have done the same as you and gone ahead with making them up. If the client asks just explain the situation, she wants as many curtains as possible and you didn't like to waste anything so had to compromise on the interlining.
                Kindest Regards,
                Karen

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